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Over the past couple of months, we at Divine Living have been producing interviews with fabulous women entrepreneurs all over the world. A few weeks ago, my Editor-in-Chief and Stylist Sam Saboura turned to me and said, “Gina, it’s your turn.” In the spirit of introducing myself, I thought, why not? Many of you know me from my Radio Show, Programs, or Speaking Engagements, but you may not know the story behind this magazine. Since I know no better way to tell it then in conversation, my editors and I all met at the beautiful Four Seasons in Santa Barbara for a lunch Q&A. Read on to get my take on what Divine Living is all about and learn how I went from life coach to business woman to magazine founder.

SAM: Let’s start from the beginning. What inspired you to launch your own magazine?

GINA: This magazine is my childhood dream come true. From the age of six through high school, I was constantly playing around with scrapbooks. They were fairly elaborate and extensive, with cut-outs from glossies, family vacation photos, drawings and found objects. So I’ve always had an interest in creative visual expression, however my career as a business coach thus far hasn’t really been about lifestyle and beautiful images. Creating the Divine Living Magazine for me is like coming full circle and manifesting a childhood dream.

SAM: Tell us more about your career thus far. What has it been about?

GINA: In my twenties, I worked at the White House, the Supreme Court, and Harvard’s Institute of Politics. I also got a Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology, worked with Marianne Williamson, and finally became a life and success coach. So I was focused on internal things, like psychology, spirituality, public impact, and transforming lives—including my own. 20 years later, with Divine Living Magazine, I’m now able to fully integrate all of my passions, which is so exciting. Speaking for ambitious and career-driven women, I know there are parts of ourselves that can get left behind along the way. This magazine is about reclaiming those parts.

SAM: For people who don’t know, what is a Personal Development Coach or Life Coach?

GINA: You can call it a Personal Development Coach, a Success Coach, a Transformational Coach, etc, but generally, a Life Coach provides a form of guidance that’s been lost in modern times. In traditional societies, the family tribe would provide mentoring and wisdom on how to do life really well, but few of us today have access to that kind of extensive support network. Life Coaching as a profession started to appear in the 60s and 70s to fill that void. Many people went from hiring a therapist in the 80s to seeking out coaches in the 90s. The difference is that therapy is more about healing past issues, whereas life coaching is focused on the present and the future. It’s working with someone to create their life desires. There are different specialists who focus in on different areas—health, relationships, business, spirituality—but my personal style has been to integrate many.

SAM: You’re arguably one of the most influential coaches of the moment. Tell us about your message. What’s made you stand out?

GINA: I don’t know any other coaches who have incorporated lifestyle, luxury, business and femininity into their message the way I have. There are certainly coaches who teach femininity, but there is not a lot of femininity in business coaching, and vice-versa. Introducing a luxury element to the industry was also unique. It had long been the norm to host events at airport hotels,

but I do mine at 5-star resorts like the Four Seasons. The experiences I create are glamorous and feminine, which is a better reflection of me and my clients. The global scope of what I do is also important. My coaching certification program has live events in Paris, Sydney, LA and Miami. I love to travel, and the more I do, the more I realize how similar we all really are—how we have the same struggles and desires. My passion is empowering women, and I care about women in Shanghai as much as I do women in St. Louis.

SAM: What led you to develop this way of living?

many ways, many of us struggle to give ourselves permission to spend money on ourselves or take time for ourselves. Women should feel confident demanding the best for themselves. I heard a story about Donald Trump once. He was meeting a real estate agent in Palm Beach and he said, “Show me the best house in this neighborhood.” That really struck me, because before then, I didn’t think that way. I never would think, “Give me the best for myself.” I practice this now. The Course in Miracles says, “Our problem is not that we ask for too much, but for too little.” I truly believe there is an amazing opportunity now for women to ask for more in life.

 

gina-reddess-trees

 

GINA: Well I was broke with ruined credit, living in a small apartment in Santa Monica and just barely getting by. I looked at all of the women role models around me, the successful ones at the tops of their industries. And I noticed that they were all very masculine. I was about as interested in becoming masculine as I was interested in being broke, so I decided to figure out how to be wealthy and feminine. In the mid 2000’s being a feminine business woman was not so much part of the conversation, but very quickly I found out that millions of women also wanted that life and were seeking guidance for it.

SAM: How is the modern woman entrepreneur different from generations past?

GINA: Since entering the workplace, women have been taught that they can’t have both a meaningful career and a fulfilling personal life. Today’s woman entrepreneur doesn’t buy that, and wants better for herself. She knows there’s something more for her. More than just a big paycheck and a corner office, and more than marrying rich and sitting poolside. With technology and the internet, women have new opportunities to create businesses on their own terms and the lives of their dreams, and for many of us, that includes travel—a lot of it! As entrepreneurs in our own power, we are flourishing.

SAM: How does elevating your lifestyle tie into being in your power?

GINA: What I know about personal development is that life gives you what you ask of it. Women are taught to give to everyone but themselves—to their clients, cause, work, husband, children, and elderly parents. As far we’ve come in so

 

SAM: What’s your message to up-and-coming women entrepreneurs?

GINA: At Divine Living Magazine, we believe that you can have it all, without giving up your femininity or yourself. It’s been so entrenched that you have to work really hard to make a lot of money, that most women will stop their own growth and limit their ability to have success and impact in the world. I want to dispel that myth. You can have it all, you can achieve your dreams. Sometimes with grace and ease, and other times with a bit more hustle, but never through becoming an old fashioned workaholic. However, to have it all, you cannot do it all —which is why so many articles in this magazine will talk about investing in yourself, building your team, learning to delegate and allowing yourself to be in your zone of genius. You can work less and grow more, make more and have more impact, you just have to do it in a certain way.

SAM: Why are you so passionate about empowering women?

GINA: This is the most extraordinary time in the history of the planet for women to be living. Baby Boomer women are considered the wealthiest and freest women who have ever walked the planet. When I was working in Washington, I thought that the people with more money, knowledge, and power than I had were going to make the changes that I wanted to see in the world. I realized that I was just handing over my power. Why not me? Why not us? The people who have been leading the world thus far have gotten us to where we are, both good and bad. And I think that if women are able to have more power, financially and emotionally, and have more voice, more visibility, then we have the opportunity to make major changes in the world.

SAM: Let’s start from the beginning. What inspired you to launch your own magazine?

GINA: This magazine is my childhood dream come true. From the age of six through high school, I was constantly playing around with scrapbooks. They were fairly elaborate and extensive, with cut-outs from glossies, family vacation pthotos, drawings and found objects. So I’ve always had an interest in creative visual expression, however my career as a business coach thus far hasn’t really been about lifestyle and beautiful images. Creating the Divine Living Magazine for me is like coming full circle and manifesting a childhood dream.

SAM: Tell us more about your career thus far. What has it been about?

GINA: In my twenties, I worked at the White House, the Supreme Court, and Harvard’s Institute of Politics. I also got a Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology, worked with Marianne Williamson, and finally became a life and success coach. So I was focused on internal things, like psychology, spirituality, public impact, and transforming lives—including my own. 20 years later, with Divine Living Magazine, I’m now able to fully integrate all of my passions, which is so exciting. Speaking for ambitious and career-driven women, I know there are parts of ourselves that can get left behind along the way. This magazine is about reclaiming those parts.

SAM: For people who don’t know, what is a Personal Development Coach or Life Coach?

GINA: You can call it a Personal Development Coach, a Success Coach, a Transformational Coach, etc, but generally, a Life Coach provides a form of guidance that’s been lost in modern times. In traditional societies, the family tribe would provide mentoring and wisdom on how to do life really well, but few of us today have access to that kind of extensive support network. Life Coaching as a profession started to appear in the 60s and 70s to fill that void. Many people went from hiring a therapist in the 80s to seeking out coaches in the 90s. The difference is that therapy is more about healing past issues, whereas life coaching is focused on the present and the future. It’s working with someone to create their life desires. There are different specialists who focus in on different areas—health, relationships, business, spirituality—but my personal style has been to integrate many.

SAM: You’re arguably one of the most influential coaches of the moment. Tell us about your message. What’s made you stand out?

GINA: I don’t know any other coaches who have incorporated lifestyle, luxury, business and femininity into their message the way I have. There are certainly coaches who teach femininity, but there is not a lot of femininity in business coaching, and vice-versa. Introducing a luxury element tothe industry was also unique. It had long been the norm to host events at airport hotels, but I do mine at 5-star resorts like the Four Seasons. The experiences I create are glamorous and feminine, which is a better reflection of me and my clients. The global scope of what I do is also important. My coaching certification program has live events in Paris, Sydney, LA and Miami. I love to travel, and the more I do, the more I realize how similar we all really are—how we have the same struggles and desires. My passion is empowering women, and I care about women in Shanghai as much as I do women in St. Louis.

gina-red

SAM: What led you to develop this way of living?

GINA: Well I was broke with ruined credit, living in a small apartment in Santa Monica and just barely getting by. I looked at all of the women role models around me, the successful ones at the tops of their industries. And I noticed that they were all very masculine. I was about as interested in becoming masculine as I was interested in being broke, so I decided to figure out how to be wealthy and feminine. In the mid 2000’s being a feminine business woman was not so much part of the conversation, but very quickly I found out that millions of women also wanted that life and were seeking guidance for it.

SAM: How is the modern woman entrepreneur different from generations past?

GINA: Since entering the workplace, women have been taught that they can’t have both a meaningful career and a fulfilling personal life. Today’s woman entrepreneur doesn’t buy that, and wants better for herself. She knows there’s something more for her. More than just a big paycheck and a corner office, and more than marrying rich and sitting poolside. With technology and the internet, women have new opportunities to create businesses on their own terms and the lives of their dreams, and for many of us, that includes travel—a lot of it! As entrepreneurs in our own power, we are flourishing.

SAM: How does elevating your lifestyle tie into being in your power?

GINA: What I know about personal development is that life gives you what you ask of it. Women are taught to give to everyone but themselves—to their clients, cause, work, husband, children, and elderly parents. As far we’ve come in so many ways, many of us struggle to give ourselves permission to spend money on ourselves or take time for ourselves. Women should feel confident demanding the best for themselves. I heard a story about Donald Trump once. He was meeting a real estate agent in Palm Beach and he said, “Show me the best house in this neighborhood.” That really struck me, because before then, I didn’t think that way. I never would think, “Give me the best for myself.” I practice this now. The Course in Miracles says, “Our problem is not that we ask for too much, but for too little.” I truly believe there is an amazing opportunity now for women to ask for more in life.

SAM: What’s your message to up-and-coming women entrepreneurs?

GINA: At Divine Living Magazine, we believe that you can have it all, without giving up your femininity or yourself. It’s been so entrenched that you have to work really hard to make a lot of money, that most women will stop their own growth and limit their ability to have success and impact in the world. I want to dispel that myth. You can have it all, you can achieve your dreams. Sometimes with grace and ease, and other times with a bit more hustle, but never through becoming an old fashioned workaholic. However, to have it all, you cannot do it all —which is why so many articles in this magazine will talk about investing in yourself, building your team, learning to delegate and allowing yourself to be in your zone of genius. You can work less and grow more, make more and have more impact, you just have to do it in a certain way.

SAM: Why are you so passionate about empowering women?

GINA: This is the most extraordinary time in the history of the planet for women to be living. Baby Boomer women are considered the wealthiest and freest women who have ever walked the planet. When I was working in Washington, I thought that the people with more money, knowledge, and power than I had were going to make the changes that I wanted to see in the world. I realized that I was just handing over my power. Why not me? Why not us? The people who have been leading the world thus far have gotten us to where we are, both good and bad. And I think that if women are able to have more power, financially and emotionally, and have more voice, more visibility, then we have the opportunity to make major changes in the world.

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